Nigel Farage Reacts on the Vote to Delay Brexit Good Morning Britain

Speaker 1:
What is your reaction then to the results of the votes last night?

Nigel Farage:
Look, we voted to leave. We backed it up in a general election. 500 MPs voted for Article 50, which said we leave on the 29th of March, with or without a deal, and now we have a big majority in Parliament not to leave on March the 29th. I think Keith, your interviewee, who was from the remain camp, whether you remain or leave, we just want the government to get on with this, end this agony that we’re going through, and let’s get on with the rest of our lives. To me, the only logical thing we can now do is to leave on March the 29th with no-deal, because her deal has failed twice.

Speaker 3:
But the Prime Minister said-

Speaker 1:
[crosstalk 00:00:46] she’s doing her best to get her deal through, isn’t she?

Speaker 3:
… and she would say the logical way to get Brexit … in fact, if we delay there’s a danger that Brexit won’t happen … the logical way to get Brexit is to go for her deal.

Nigel Farage:
Well, the trouble with her deal … and by the way, it’s not a deal, it’s a new European treaty. I’ve read that treaty. I’ve studied it. In many ways, it’s even worse than being a member of the European Union, in terms of us being bound in to European rules, possibly in perpetuity. And the next phase of negotiations … and I met Mr. Barnier earlier this week … the next phase of negotiations could take another four years. I don’t think we wanna go through that process. This deal’s the wrong deal. The Prime Minister has made an horrendous mess of it. So let’s just leave. Let’s have a clean break in a few days time and get on with things.

Speaker 3:
But Parliament’s voted against no-deal. All the economic analysis says no-deal will be disastrous. You still want no-deal, because you want something to happen to take us towards Brexit. And you’re right, it does look like it might not be able to happen now. I think everybody who voted for it will be fearful of that this morning. But being practical, and thinking of those whose jobs and lives depend on it, everything that we looked at looks like no-deal will be disastrous.

Nigel Farage:
Look, we were told if we didn’t join the Euro, it’d be a disaster. We were told if we voted Brexit, half a million jobs would go immediately. The opposite has happened. This is not about some economic forecast, some doom mongering, this is a democratic choice of the British people in the biggest democratic exercise in our history. We want to become an independent country, free of being governed by Mr. Juncker and Mr. Tusk and all of these people, and Parliament is not delivering on its promises. That really is the crux of this problem.

Speaker 1:
Right. Well, the plan is now to get an extension to ensure the fact that they can do that, to try and sort out a deal. You’re not helping them, are you? You’ve campaigned for European leaders to refuse any extension. Is it true that you’ll now be speaking to them and saying that you think that they should stop the extension happening? That’s an act of sabotage, isn’t it?

Nigel Farage:
I don’t want four more years of agony, and there are many other European countries who would rather we just got on with this. And come on, I am trying to honor the way the British people voted in a referendum, in a general election, and a promise that a Prime Minister made over 100 times to the British people. I want us to leave on March 29th, and I think that European summit that takes place next Thursday, it could be a very dramatic evening. But if other countries say, “We don’t wanna go on with this, we just want Britain to leave,” then I think they’d be doing us the most enormous favor.

Speaker 1:
So you’re saying get out at any cost. Are you saying that you will be speaking to European leaders to ask them to refuse an extension?

Nigel Farage:
I’m gonna speak to other European leaders to say, “Look, do you really want four more years of this agony, which is Mr. Barnier’s proposal?” I’m not sure I’ve got much influence over them, but please don’t think just because a British Prime Minister turns up in Brussels next Thursday and asks for extension, it’s not guaranteed, I promise you.

Nigel Farage on Brexit and Donald Trump (Full CNN interview)

Speaker 1:
If David Cameron is to some extent the official player on behalf of the United Kingdom in the dinners and meetings, Nigel Farage is probably the unofficial leader in that sense, because he was the unofficial leader within a large point of the Brexit campaign. We’ve already heard your speech, or part of it, in parliament this morning. You were almost gratuitously rude to the parliamentarians, and you enjoyed it.

Nigel Farage:
No, look, they were abusing me from the moment I started. Twice the president of the parliament had to cease proceedings and say, “Please listen to Mr. Farage.” Then what I said to them, can we be grownup about this? Can we talk about trade deals? And then they all laughed and giggled. That was when I said to them, “Well of course the trouble with you people is none of you have ever had a proper job,” which wasn’t wrong.

Speaker 1:
But the point is, Mr. Farage, it hardly endears you to the very people who are going to have to give their consent to an agreement in two years time if you are read to them.

Nigel Farage:
Well, they called me all the names under the sun, I just teased them about the fact they’re basically a bunch of bureaucrats who’ve never had a proper job. Look, forget that.

Speaker 1:
You don’t like them?

Nigel Farage:
They don’t like me, it’s mutual.

Speaker 1:
And you haven’t liked them for how many years?

Nigel Farage:
All 17 that I’ve been here. Look, what they’ve tried to do is to build a political union without consent. And I’ve been in there to fight against it. And finally a member state of this union has said we wish to succeed, and they didn’t like it much.

Speaker 1:
So, our viewers in the United States who are watching now and wondering what on earth is going to happen to Britain, how can Britain thrive, I didn’t say survive, I say thrive outside the European Union when the banks have been decimated in the share price, and the threats have been very severe?

Nigel Farage:
Do you know, yesterday …

Speaker 1:
And the pound has fallen 13, 14%.

Nigel Farage:
And the FTSE’s up 3% today, 12% up since its lows in February. Sterling is much marginally lower than it was in February, so can we stop this nonsense about the markets? The pound has been in a better market since July 2014, fact. Now, American viewers, imagine if NAFTA was a political union. Imagine if a court in Mexico could overall anything that congress did. Imagine if you had free movement of people with Mexico, how would you feel? You wouldn’t like it. And what we’re doing in the UK, we’re reasserting our democratic rights, and in terms of business and trade, we’ll go on trading.

Speaker 1:
You are starting to sound in some way, with the similar policies to Donald Trump. Now, he admires the Brexit result, he said it was fantastic, it was brilliant. Do you admire Donald Trump in this US Presidential Election?

Nigel Farage:
Well, Donald Trump dares to talk about things that other people want to brush under the carpet. What Mr. Trump is doing in America is very different from what I’m trying to do in the United Kingdom. My problem in politics is far greater than Donald Trump’s. We literally have lost our sovereignty, lost our borders, lost our ability [crosstalk 00:03:08].

Speaker 1:
He would say the same thing about US borders.

Nigel Farage:
Well, the problem that you’ve got in the US is illegal immigration. Our problem is legal immigration to half a billion people.

Speaker 1:
So, you wouldn’t be looking to him for too much support, because on the one hand he also says if he becomes President of the United States, Barack Obama’s going to the back of the trade queue wouldn’t happen, you’d be at the front of the queue. So, in many ways you must hope he becomes president.

Nigel Farage:
Well, I think for the United Kingdom, I think Trump would be better for us than Barack Obama’s been, of that there’s no doubt.

Speaker 1:
And against Hilary Clinton? Or are you not going to take sides at this early stage?

Nigel Farage:
There’s nothing on Earth could persuade me ever to vote for Hilary Clinton.

Speaker 1:
You sure you don’t want to think about that for a second?

Nigel Farage:
No, absolutely not. I mean she represents the political elite, it’s almost as if she feels she has a divine right to have that job.

Speaker 1:
You keep talking about the political elite, you keep talking about the establishment, sir, you’re part of it. You’ve been here for 17 years.

Nigel Farage:
Yeah, but I came into it from business. I used to trade commodities and currencies. I had a proper job once.

Speaker 1:
So, how on earth do you have the effrontery to criticize Wall Street, the banks. You criticize big business when you were part of those markets.

Nigel Farage:
Well, yeah, but the markets aren’t just dominated by big business. Good markets have small and medium sized competitors trading in them too. And look, the actions of Goldman Sachs in cahoots with this European Commission, getting Greece into the Euro and everything else, we need change.

Speaker 1:
All right, you’ve got your change, you’ve got your referendum. You’ve got to agree that the UK at the moment, the Labour Party has imploded, Jeremy Corbyn has lost the … opposition party that is … has lost the vote of confidence. The prime minister has resigned. You’ve got leadership elections in two parties, this is sending a terrible message about what’s happening in Britain [crosstalk 00:05:08].

Nigel Farage:
It’s a great message.

Speaker 1:
How can you say that, sir?

Nigel Farage:
It’s a great message. Our political class have let us down like a cheap pair of braces, and what we did last week in that referendum was say get thee gone. Political change will be a good healthy constructive thing.

Speaker 1:
How much damage are you prepared to see, because the chancellor now accepts that there will be a recession, he said so on BBC Radio this morning, he accepts that there’s going to be economic damage. How much damage are you prepared to accept before you rebuild the house?

Nigel Farage:
Do you know something? Freedom, independence, democracy, not being a slave for somebody else is something upon which you can’t put a price. And what we did last Thursday is we voted to take back our country, to take back our laws, our courts, our borders, our pride and self respect. And do you know what? Actually I think in trade terms we’re going to do better than we did before. Just last night the Australia and New Zealand prime minister’s said they want to come to the front of the queue for a trade deal with Britain.

Speaker 1:
Now, let’s just look at our European partners, Angela Merkel sounds as if she’s pardon the pun, angling to do a deal, or at least there is a deal. But they won’t allow informal negotiations without Article 50 being invoked. And that’s not going to be invoked, this is the article when the time limit begins. So, when would you like to see it invoked?

Nigel Farage:
I feel now that there is a logic that says that there is a degree of uncertainty as to where we’re going with all of this, and it doesn’t make sense to wait until the autumn. I think what the government needs to do is to put a negotiating team in place, and to declare Article 50, to invoke it, within the next few weeks.

Speaker 1:
Within the next few weeks?

Nigel Farage:
Yeah.

Speaker 1:
Before the next leader is in place, before the new prime minister?

Nigel Farage:
Yeah, I think you do need to send a message that we’re serious about this. We didn’t play around, we’re honoring the referendum result. Let’s crack on.

Speaker 1:
A couple more questions, do you have a view on the next prime minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland?

Nigel Farage:
As long as he or she is committed to upholding the will of 17.5 million people last Thursday in that referendum, I couldn’t care less who it is. What I don’t want to see is backsliding.

Speaker 1:
Just on this question about the money, you’ve been ousted a million times, you’ve said you would never have made that promise about spending £350 million on the NHS. But, when that promise was being made, Mr. Farage, you weren’t out there saying hang on, this isn’t right, you can’t make this guarantee. Hang on, this is being disingenuous. Hang on, this money needs to be spent elsewhere. You kept quiet.

Nigel Farage:
I kept saying that net, our contribution was £220 million a week, which we could spend on whatever we chose.

Speaker 1:
But you didn’t challenge your fellow Brexiteers on their assertion that it would go to …

Nigel Farage:
No.

Speaker 1:
… should you have done?

Nigel Farage:
Well, that’s my problem, I’m just too soft, too kind, and too easy.

Speaker 1:
There are many words that I would use to describe you, sir, none of those would come within my vocabulary. Finally, if you were in the room tonight, at dinner, you’d probably be on the menu rather than actually sitting at the table, but if you were in the room at dinner, what would you be saying to your fellow European partners over the Chateaubriand? We don’t know what’s on the menu, but …

Nigel Farage:
The wine would be good.

Nigel Farage:
I would just say let’s stop threatening, let’s stop being silly. You need us far more than we need you. Let’s crack on, have a sensible tariff free trade deal, and allow us to be free, to go off and pursue our global ambitions.

Speaker 1:
Nigel Farage, thank you sir. There’s an enormous number of people waiting to talk to you, so I thank you as always for being honest and forthright as always.

Personal statement by Nigel Farage MEP regarding the extradition of Chris Tappin to the USA

Christopher Tappin is a retired buisnessman from Orpington, South East London.

He has now been extradited to the United States over charges of conspiring to sell parts for Iranian missiles after a last ditch plea to block the extradition failed.

Mr Tappin denies conspiring to export the batteries for Hawk air defence missiles and believes he is the victim of a “sting” by the FBI.

Cameron has been ‘wholly destructive’ in Tappin Case: Farage

“Mr Cameron’s role in the whole Tappin affair has been wholly destructive. By his office publicly voicing concerns over Mr Tappin’s defence. He of all people should recognise that All defendants are entitled to the presumption of innocence before trial. To that end, Cameron should be agitating to ensure he gets bail, rather than repeating untested allegations whilst Tappin remains in prison, unable to answer for himself. Silence on the Prime Minister’s part would have been more constructive than what he has done. Tappin’s guilt or innocence is beside the point. What is, is the way that due process and fairness has been overthrown to earn brownie points with his new best friend in the Whitehouse.”

Neil Tappin, Christopher Tappin’s son today said

“My father, as with any person charged with any offence, is unquestionably entitled to the presumption of innocence. Any official, elected or otherwise, who fails to recognize and apply that most basic principle, should be ashamed.

“There is now much misinformation now being peddled, ie that my father is accused of arms dealing – which is not true. He stands accused of failing to get an export license to export controlled goods, albeit he was in fact the shipping agent for items he believed were destined for the automotive industry, acting under instructions from his client. Furthermore, no evidence whatsoever has been presented that my father “discussed the specifics of the plot” with federal US agents. My father intends to demonstrate the fallacy of the prosecution’s case at trial.

“Judge Castaneda, presiding over the original US bail hearing, concurred that my father appeared to have a strong defence to the allegations. We were therefore stunned when bail was denied. The US prosecutor has throughout contested my father’s bail application, claiming that he’s a danger to the community and at risk of fleeing the jurisdiction. Yet for 2 years my father has fully complied with each and every condition of bail that was required of him by the UK courts. There is no reason at all to conclude he is either a flight risk or a danger to anyone.

“Our family asks for nothing more than the support of the UK government in securing bail now my father is in the US. The irony is that a British citizen is being accused of being a “flight risk” by the US in part because he did nothing more than exercise his lawful right to resist extradition in the UK. Instead of acknowledging such, the Prime Minister’s quoted comments today suggest he is acting as Judge, Jury and executioner. We are extremely disappointed by his comments.

“My father, and all those subjected to this discredited piece of UK legislation, deserves the presumption of innocence before trial.”

People can register their support for Chris Tappin by signing this petition

“It is time we stood up for Mr. Tappin and other UK nationals and told the USA we wish to amend this Treaty.”

Hugh’s Fish Fight

Letter to those who have been contacted by Chris Davies MEP:

First let me stress that the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) has been a complete environmental, economic and social disaster and UKIP uses what say it has in the EU “Parliament” to vote against discards and protect British fishing.

Where Mr. Davies claims that UKIP and the political group we are attached to, does not have its views represented on the CFP reform is simply not true.

1. When Mr. Farage cannot attend a fisheries committee meeting there is always a substitute member who takes his place.  So the vote we are given on the committee is used by a nominated substitute and not wasted.

2.  May I direct you to a short video of Nigel directly challenging the EU fisheries Commissioner on discards, in the fisheries committee:
http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=aUYrj-mjIu4

3. The CFP reform comes in a number of different legislative proposals.  One of which was authored by an MEP of our political group.  So to say our group has not been involved in CFP reform is very naughty to say the least.

4.  We have a dedicated UKIP staff member who follows very closely all legislative proposals which come through the fisheries committee and we most certainly table amendments and seek to defend British fishingrights where we can.  For example – Mr. Farage will be tabling amendments on shark finning, which will close the loopholes in EU law and help ban the awful practise outright.

What Mr. Davies fails to mention is that MEPs have very little say over EU legislation.  The only people who can propose, repeal or initiate reform of EU law is the EU Commission who are not elected at all.  It is true MEPs can make amendments to legislation but that needs agreement with the EU Council and also, if a bill reaches a second reading, the Commission can have such amendments removed fairly easily.

The UK has given up 100% of fishing regulation to the EU.  The MPs you elect can’t do anything about it, theUK government can’t do anything about it, the MEPs you vote for are powerless to initiate any reform. No one you vote for can initiate or substantially change any CFP reform.

The only way we can deal with the problem of discards is by taking back control of fishing policy and instituting policies to end such waste – which means kicking the EU out of Britain.

UKIP policy on fishing can be summarised as below:

• Immediately withdraw from the Common Fisheries Policy

• Reassert our territorial rights, reclaim our fishing grounds, restore our fishing fleet and support our fishingindustry for future generations

• Return £2.5bn a year in fish sales to the UK economy

• Establish an ‘Exclusive Economic Zone’ extending 200 nautical miles from the UK’s coastline over which the UK exerts total control

• Abandon all EU quotas and strictly forbid the shameful discarding of dead fish – sometimes up to 70% of catches or 800,000 tons p.a.

• Require all commercial species of fish caught, regardless of size or species, to be landed and recorded. This will allow the Government to determine how best to manage the recovery of UK fishing grounds. To preservefish stocks, UKIP will establish a system of moveable ‘No Take Zones’ allowing fish to spawn and assisting recovery in overfished areas

• Ban all forms of industrial fishing and pair trawling for bass. Industrial trawlers have helped cause a catastrophic decline in key fish species

• Strengthen the UK’s Fishery Protection resources to guard British fishing grounds

Yours sincerely

Nigel Farage MEP

Statement on Hugh’s Fish Fight

Many thanks to everyone who has sent me letters regarding the disastrous and morally bankrupt Common Fisheries Policy. This is something which I have been campaigning against for many years and as a Sea Angler is a policy very close to my heart.

Please find below my response to your enquiries:

Dear Correspondent

Thank you for your email regarding reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

The CFP has, quite frankly, been an economic and environmental disaster in which the UK fishing industry and fish stocks have suffered terribly.

The draconian quotas system, forced on to us by the EU, has led to the throwing of dead fish back into the sea. For example in the North Sea, nearly half of all fish caught are thrown back dead. That is nearly one million tonnes a year.

But the question remains what we can do about it?

As I’m sure you are aware, the UK gave up regulation of the fishing industry to the EU. So not one MP you or anyone else elected in the UK can propose or amend law regarding discards or the wider fishing sector. The government repeatedly comes out against discards, as was seen by the recent “fish fight” (CFP reform) campaign led by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. What is laughably called the Fisheries Minister, supports Hugh, but can do nothing about it.

So Hugh went to the top. He met with EU Commissioner Damanaki (Fisheries portfolio) and for the cameras, she said that “you the people can make this change” – when in fact this isn’t true. The EU parliament has very little say and is easily ignored by the Commission, which is the only body that can really regulate.

The UK MPs you elect can’t do anything about it, the UK government can’t do anything about it, the MEPs you vote for are powerless to initiate reform. No one you vote for can initiate or substantially change any CFP reform. It is at this point I have to ask the question, what sort of democracy do we live in when we can’t change a policy by the ballot box?

This gets to the core of my position. The only way we can deal with the problem of discards is by taking back control of fishing policy and instituting policies to end such waste – which means kicking the EU out of Britain.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are more and more areas becoming an EU “competence”; look at environmental legislation and the effects of bio fuels on developing countries, look at the Common Agriculture Policy – one disaster after another and there’s nothing we can do about it because the Commission calls the shots, and we can’t vote them in or out.

UKIP policy on fishing can be summarised as below:

• Immediately withdraw from the Common Fisheries Policy

• Reassert our territorial rights, reclaim our fishing grounds, restore our fishing fleet and support our fishing industry for future generations

• Return £2.5bn a year in fish sales to the UK economy

• Establish an ‘Exclusive Economic Zone’ extending 200 nautical miles from the UK’s coastline over which the UK exerts total control

• Abandon all EU quotas and strictly forbid the shameful discarding of dead fish – sometimes up to 70% of catches or 800,000 tons p.a.

• Require all commercial species of fish caught, regardless of size or species, to be landed and recorded. This will allow the Government to determine how best to manage the recovery of UK fishing grounds. To preserve fish stocks, UKIP will establish a system of moveable ‘No Take Zones’ allowing fish to spawn and assisting recovery in overfished areas

• Ban all forms of industrial fishing and pair trawling for bass. Industrial trawlers have helped cause a catastrophic decline in key fish species

As a member of the Fisheries Committee in the EU “Parliament” I have made many speeches against discards.

Here is one from the hearing of Commissioner Damanaki:

I shall, of course, vote against the quota system any chance I get, and will continue to speak out against discards as much as I can in the media.

Yours sincerely,

Nigel Farage

Je Suis Charlie: European Leaders Must Take Action

Nigel Farage spoke in the European Parliament in Strasbourg today, offering his condolences to those affected, and drawing attention to the political decisions that have led to European countries with massively ghettoised populations.

Policies such as swift mass migration, as well as Europe’s foreign wars, have overlapped with what Mr Farage called a “civil war within Islam” to create the scenario that sadly played out on France’s streets last week.

Watch the full video, below:


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Nigel Speaks to A Level Students at #PolEconUK Conference

UKIP leader Nigel Farage this morning spoke to hundreds of A-Level students at London’s Methodist Hall, discussing UKIP policies and the future of British politics.

Nigel fielded questions from the student audience, as well as outlining UKIP’s policies on foreign aid, tuition fees, and more.

He spoke of the party’s commitment to scrapping tuition fees for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) students, and discussed how UKIP isn’t an anti-immigration party, but rather is dedicated to a sensible, UK-controlled Labour market policy.

Students responded positively to the speech, with dozens queuing for ‘selfie’ photos afterwards.

Nigel tweeted: “Great speaking to so many students at the A-Level Politics Conference in London today. Sorry I couldn’t stay for more selfies!”

READ MORE ABOUT UKIP POLICIES HERE.